Mt. Lassen – a Geological Must-See

Mt. Lassen – a Geological Must-See

About 100 of us gathered in Cramer Hall 53 to hear the very knowledgeable geologist Dr. Scott Burns talk about his newest adventure – first trip to Mt. Lassen National Park. This active volcano, the southernmost in the Cascade Mountains, last erupted in 1916. The mode of eruptions seems to be bi-modal – either quiet or violent. The volcano was named after Danish immigrant Peter Lassen who was a local blacksmith. The LA Times recently wrote that Mt. Lassen was California’s “most overlooked volcanic park” with only 400,000 visitors per year, as compared with Yosemite’s 4-million visitors per year.

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Board Meeting Notes - February 14, 2015

Board Meeting Notes - February 14, 2015

President Sheila Alfsen called the meeting to the home of Rosemary Kenney. Other board members in attendance constituting quorum were Paul Edison-Lahm, Marty Muncie, Bev Vogt, Bo Nonn, and John Piccinnini. Also in attendance was GSOC member Bart Bartels, and Directors-elect Kirben Smoody and Larry Purchase. The minutes of the December 13th, 2014 board meeting were approved. The Treasurer’s report was approved by the board. 

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Welcome GSOC's New Public Outreach Coordinator Sheila Alfsen!

Welcome GSOC's New Public Outreach Coordinator Sheila Alfsen!

The GSOC board has created at new Public Outreach Coordinator position to address our objective of supporting and promoting geologic study and research, Outgoing GSOC President Prof. Sheila Alfsen has volunteered to staff the position in keeping with her love of public education. She has given numerous public talks to civic groups and schools throughout her term as president — and looks forward to keeping the public’s interest and curiosity for Geology alive. Contact her for speaking engagements!

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Charter GSOC member Lon Hancock was first to discover vertebrate fossils in the Oregon's Clarno Formation

Charter GSOC member Lon Hancock was first to discover vertebrate fossils in the Oregon's Clarno Formation

BY VIOLA L. OBERSON
GSOC PRESIDENT 1984

Reprinted with permission from Oregon Geology, Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries, December 1979.

Paleontologistthe world over know of the work of Alonzo Wesley "Lon" Hancock (1884-1961). Professional men from the universities and museums of the world came to hidoor to study the fossils he found. He considered himself an amateur, attained no college degrees, and published no scientific papers, but the fossils his persistence enabled him to find have been the subjects of numeroupapers, master's theses, and doctoral dissertations. And part of the geologic history of ancient Oregon has had to be rewritten because of hidiscoveries.

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Evolutionary Flight Paths (Dr Orr: "There were many")

Evolutionary Flight Paths (Dr Orr: "There were many")

January Lecture Given by Prof. William Orr

Over 100 of us gathered in Cramer Hall 53 – a big upgrade from the smaller classroom – to hear a former aeronautical engineering student now turned paleontologist share the geologic evidence on how the ability to fly has come to evolve.  He described the various modes of flight and the thresholds between what humans might define as “true flight” and all the ways evolution has developed gliding, falling, and powered flight.  The idea of flight is a major part of American culture, along with automobiles.  The idea of flight goes back to ancient times.  How did the wing evolve?  Unlike a simple airfoil, a bird-wing is a complex venetian-blind like structure and with an opening-and-closing folding motion. 

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